September 13th, 2010

Imaginational Anthem v 4 : New Possibilities

The fourth volume of the acclaimed guitar series. Available Sept 21.

Features C Joynes, Tyler Ramsey (Band of Horses), William Tyler (Silver Jews) and more

Gatefold LP & CD Artwork by Paul Romano (Mastodon)

Since it’s first volume in 2005, Tompkins Square’s ‘Imaginational Anthem’ series has introduced many new acoustic guitarists, and unearthed many forgotten legends of the American Primitive genre. Vol 4 strays from the formula by focusing on the present generation of pickers, representing American and English musical traditions. The stunning gatefold LP (limited edition of 500) and CD are created by Paul Romano, best known for his incredible designs for Mastodon.

PRAISE FOR IMAGINATIONAL ANTHEM VOLS. 1-3 BOX SET (TSQ1899) :

“Simply put, these are all essential recordings, they offer solid evidence of how the tradition continues from the ’60s to the present day in the same way that albums by Fahey, Kottke, Crandell, Lang, John Renbourn, Bert Jansch, and countless others picked up on the lineages of the previous decades from folk, blues, prison songs and mountain and church music foundations, and brought it forth, shifted and changed and added and subtracted. This box is the latest entry in the long long logbook. Get it.” – 4.5 / 5 stars, All Music Guide

“Taken as a whole, these three albums provide a comprehensive overview of the ongoing American Primitive movement, and will likely provide a large enough reservoir to tide you over handsomely should that acoustic guitar drought ever come.” – Pitchfork

“The single most significant body of solo acoustic guitar music to be published in the 21st century so far” – Boomkat

August 10th, 2010

‘Bloody War : Songs 1924-1939′ available August 24th


Soldier’s laments, heart-songs, and patriotic tunes have been an essential part of the American soundscape for many generations.  Most of these compositions, however, have been identified with the Vietnam war or with World War II.  This newly minted collection presents performances captured between 1924 and 1939 of songs originating from the American Civil War, the Spanish-American War, and the “war to end all wars,” the First World War.  These recordings were the folk foundation both of the common soldier’s perspective of the battlefield and of the family and loved ones that were left behind.

‘Bloody War’ recreates the musical panorama of the early 20th century with songs of warfare that are humorous and tragic, sardonic and vivid.  Many of these songs have not been heard since they were originally issued in the 1920s and 1930s and are as relevant today as they were when they were first composed.  Highlights of this collection include the masterpiece “Dixie Division” by Fiddlin’ John Carson, the legendary Atlanta, GA entertainer that was among the first rural performers to wax country music.  His idiosyncratic fiddling meshes together a paean for Southern soldiers that have fought in the American Civil War to the First World War, held together with a medley of “Dixie,” “Swanee River,” and “Yankee Doodle.” Contemporary banjoist and singer, Wade Mainer, contributes the poignant “Not A Word Of That Be Said” a mere two years before the outbreak of World War II.

A deep diversity of artists & performances are to be found in this anthology: from the inspired street-singing of William & Versey Smith to the plaintive balladry of Buell Kazee and from the red hot breakdown of Earl Johnson to the mesmerizing guitar blues of Darby & Tarlton.  Produced by Christopher King and Josh Rosenthal, with art-design by Susan Archie and liner-notes by country music historian Tony Russell.  A portion of all proceeds from the sale of this album will be donated to Iraq & Afghanistan Veterans of America (IAVA.org).

June 28th, 2010

Frank Fairfield’s Pawn Records Presents . . .

Watch the video !

‘Unheard Ofs & Forgotten Abouts
Rare and unheralded gramophone recordings from around the world (1916-1964)’
On this, the first release on Frank Fairfield’s Tompkins Square imprint, Pawn Records, Fairfield presents an exciting collection of reissued recordings from his personal 78 rpm record collection.  It provides a broad view of the “Gramophone era”, specifically concerning the recording of vernacular music from around the world: from Atlanta, Georgia to Kisumu, Kenya; from  the 10’s to the 60’s.  The records have been beautifully transferred by the highly respected record collector and producer Michael Kieffer.

Frank on tour :
6/30 – Muddy Waters  Santa Barabara, CA
7/09 – Tuft Theater  Denver, CO
7/14 – Music City Roots at The Loveless Cafe  Nashville, TN
7/15 – The Grey Eagle  Asheville, NC
7/16 – The Pinhook  Durham, NC
7/17 – Birchmere Banjo Festival Washington DC
7/20 – Jalopy  Brooklyn, NY
7/21 – The Living Room Manhattan, NY
7/22 – Maxwell’s  Hoboken, NJ
7/28 – Cedar Cultural Center with Blind Boy Paxton  Minneapolis, MN
7/30 – Wild Joe’s Coffee with Blind Boy Paxton  Bozeman, MT
7/31 – Columbia City Theater with Blind Boy Paxton, Baby Gramps Seattle, WA
8/03 – McCmenamin’s Olympic Club  Centralia, WA
8/07 – Pickathon Pendarvis Farm, OR
8/08 – Pickathon Pendarvis Farm, OR
8/15 – “Free For All” Folk Fest @ Echoplex  Los Angeles, CA

Europe

8/28 UK, NORTHAMPTONSHIRE, BARN NOVA @ SHAMBALA FESTIVAL
8/29 UK, NORWICH, PLAYHOUSE BAR
8/31 UK, SOWERBY BRIDGE, THE VINE

SEPTEMBER
Wed 1 UK, BIRMINGHAM, KITCHEN GARDEN CAFE
Thu 2 UK, LONDON, BUSH HALL W/ JAMES BLACKSHAW
Fri 3 UK, READING, SOUTH STREET
Sat 4 UK, BRIGHTON, THE PRINCE ALBERT
Sun 5 UK, LONDON, THE NORTH STAR W/ CHARLIE PARR
Mon 6 UK, CARDIFF, THE GLOBE W/ CHARLIE PARR
Tue 7 UK, COVENTRY, TAYLOR JOHNS HOUSE W/ CHARLIE PARR
Wed 8 UK, PENRYN, MISS PEAPODS W/ CHARLIE PARR
Thu 9 UK, PLYMOUTH, B-BAR W/ CHARLIE PARR
Fri 10 UK, WILTSHIRE, END OF THE ROAD FESTIVAL
Sat 11 UK, BRISTOL, ST BONAVENTURES W/ CHARLIE PARR
Sun 12 NL, NIJMEGEN, UIT FESTIVAL
Wed 15 DE, DUISBURG, STEINBRUCH
Thu 16 DE, STUTTGART, FUR FLUSSIGKEITEN & SCHWINGUNGEN
Fri 17 NL, TILBURG, INCUBATE
Sat 18 NL, GRONINGEN, TAKE ROOT FESTIVAL
Mon 20 FR, PARIS, L’INTERNATIONAL
Tue 21 FR, RENNES, INSTITUT FRANCO AMERICAIN
Wed 22 FR, NANTES, LE VIOLIN DINGUE
Thu 23 FR, BORDEAUX, LE FUNKY BURGER
Fri 24 FR, TOULOUSE, MEDIATHEQUE ASSOCIATIVE
Sat 25 FR, LYON, LE PERISCOPE
Sun 26 CH, GENEVA, ECURIE DE I’LLOT 13 (ORGANISED BY CAVE12)

May 28th, 2010

Beyond Berkeley Guitar, available June 8th

* * * * – All Music Guide

* * * * – Record Collector UK

June 17 on air KPFA, July 3 on air KALW

NYC’s Tompkins Square label is proud to present Beyond Berkeley Guitar, a collection of some of Northern California’s finest acoustic guitarists, available June 8th, 2010.

Beyond Berkeley Guitar is the follow-up to 2006’s Berkeley Guitar, which through the efforts of three young guitarists, exemplified a strong current of American Primitive guitar playing in Berkeley still thriving since the 1960’s when Takoma Records was founded there by John Fahey. That album included liner notes by Takoma’s Ed Denson, and the stunning CD and gatefold LP were designed by acclaimed painter and Baroness singer/guitarist John Baizley. Beyond Berkeley Guitar was curated and produced by Sean Smith, who also produced Berkeley Guitar. As the title suggests, Beyond Berkeley Guitar expands the boundaries, stylistically and regionally, to display the prowess of seven Bay Area guitarists, all of whom use solo guitar composition as a means of profound personal expression.

This collection spans generations of players, from Aaron Sheppard, a twenty year old virtuoso fingerpicker, to Richard Osborn, a free-raga style player who studied with Robbie Basho in the 1960’s. The album also offers the rare treat of hearing a woman represented within a genre dominated almost entirely by men; Ava Mendoza, whose wiley and highly technical playing closes the album. Included as well are two gentle players, Trevor Healy and Chuck Johnson, who both come from avant rock pasts; Lucas Boilon, who largely keeps his extreme talent to himself; and Sean Smith, who continues to stretch the boundaries of American Primitive through genre and influence re-appropriation.

There will be a record release event with performances by the players on Beyond Berkeley Guitar, June 29th at Amnesia in San Francisco.

UNCUT Review :

“Beyond Berkeley Guitar” is the latest survey of guitar soli from the ever-rewarding Tompkins Square label. This one, as the name implies, is a sequel to the “Berkeley Guitar” comp of a few years back, rounding up the current batch of Bay Area American primitives. This one’s a consistently strong and lovely set of concentrated virtuosity, the seven players recorded with a crispness and clarity that eschews rowdiness in favour of a meditative spiritual purity.

Hard to pick out a highlight from the Fahey/Basho-worshipping artists featured, though maybe Sean Smith – who also curated and produced “Beyond Berkeley Guitar” – just shades it. Special mention, too, though, to Lucas Boilon and to Ava Mendoza, the latter standing out with an electric, jazzy skip with overtones of Django Reinhardt.

May 3rd, 2010

Roland White Reissue out June 1

Tompkins Square reissues an obscure treasure on June 1, 2010.
Roland White’s 1976 solo album ‘I Wasn’t Born To Rock ‘N Roll’, originally issued on the Ridge Runner Records label, is re-mastered from the original tapes and released for the very first time on CD.
Roland White, along with his brother Clarence, made bluegrass and country music history as members of the Kentucky Colonels. Roland also played in Bill Monroe’s Blue Grass Boys and Lester Flatt’s Nashville Grass, and later in Country Gazette and the Nashville Bluegrass Band. Clarence famously played with the Byrds, among many others, until his tragic death in 1973.
This album features Alan Munde, Kenny Wertz, Roger Bush and Dave Ferguson playing traditional tunes, as well as a composition called “Powder Creek”, co-written by Roland & Clarence. This was the first appearance of this special tune on an album, a song which Roland now describes as having been composed with his brother on the New Jersey Turnpike in 1963!
The package includes original liner notes by Gene Parsons (The Byrds), new reflections from Roland, original album artwork, and one unreleased bonus track not included on the original LP!

March 19th, 2010

Alex Chilton Interview

I interviewed Alex Chilton on September 17, 1987 in Albany NY before his appearance that evening at a club called QE2. It was the peak of my Big Star fandom, and I was in awe of my polite if somewhat cranky hero. Maybe it was just that he was in Albany . . . The interview appeared in the Dec. 1987 issue of local rag Buzz Magazine. I recorded it, but I doubt I have the tape. I was lucky enough to save the magazine, and my three signed Big Star LPs. Here is the interview in its entirety :

Alex Chilton ordered the stuffed quail. (At the restaurant Quintessence- ed.) When it arrived, he offered me a piece but I refused. The salad was the best salad Alex Chilton said he’d ever eaten. There was a slab of cheese that looked like feta, but Alex insisted it was parmesan. It was feta. But Alex is from Memphis. There can’t be much feta cheese in Memphis. He didn’t want to be interviewed in the restaurant, so we sat, Alex , his two band members and I, and stared out the window. He didn’t want to be interviewed at all. The following conversation took place in his Isuzu or one of those mid sized vans :

JR: Do you understand the “pop-god” biling you’ve received ?
AC: Not really but . . . (pause)

JR: How do you feel about the Replacements song ?
AC: Uh well, I didn’t feel any way about it. I mean I’m so used to having uh you know these kind of fawning, imbecilic fans you know. To have it take on some coherence is refreshing.

JR: It seems that Big Star means more now with a modern perspective than it did when it was actually happening.
AC: It’s hard for me, you know, to understand what a young person, or a person younger than myself must perceive of that stuff. I know how nowhere it was for us at the time you know, we just made this record and worked for about a year on it cause we had time in the studio. We could do anything we wanted at the studio and the people at this place were pretty sharp technically so we did it. So we just made this record like we wanted it to sound. You know, we just made the best record we could and put it out and there was swome critical response and stuff like that and then we couldn’t sell it. Am I in your way ??!! (Yells at blocking vehicle)

JR: Do you like touring ?
AC: Yeah

JR: What about interviews ?
AC: Yeah, I don’t particularly like doing interviews but I guess getting press is a helpful thing.

JR: In your solo work, particularly No Fun and Feudalist Tarts and the new LP High Priest, there’s a sharp leaning towards the blues and less so, funk. Where does all that stem from ?
AC: I don’t know. I guess that I’m not a real fluent sort of musician, you know I’m not like Charlie Parker or somebody and so I can do some primtive sorts of blues sometimes better than a lot of other things . . . When I was playing with that group Big Star in the 70’s, they were anti-blues, the rest of the members of the group, you know, so I didn’t want to rock the boat.

JR: How do you feel about you experience with Big Star now ?
AC: You know Chris Bell, that was kinda the other leader of the band or somethin like that, was somebody whose music I dug and I feel like I learned a lot from playing with him and learned a lot about recording. It was a time in my life when I made progress.

JR: Do you feel like you’re making progress now ?
AC: Yeah

JR: You really like the new album ?
AC: Yeah. I worked hard on it.

JR: What about the title High Priest ? Is that sort of a double entendre that you like ?
AC: Maybe more like triple or quadruple. There are two songs on the record that are sort of gospel tunes and one about the Dalai Lama who if there was ever a highpriest he’s gotta be the highest one, I mean 19,000 feet or something, you know. And then you know this whole Jim & Tami that’s been shaking up you know, that’s why there’s a picture of a church ont he front and me in front of a motel on the back and then Ray Charles called himself the high priest and I’ve always been a Ray Charles fan.

JR: You just finished up a reunion tour with the Box Tops, right ?
AC: (pissed) I wasn’t saying that, no. Each summer there’s a guy who gets together a revue of 60’s groups and that comes in the summer.

JR: Let’s get back to the so-called Alex Chilton pop-god phenomenon. How do you perceive that thing ? Who are your fans ?
AC: I see the people who come to my dates. They seem to be college students who don’t look like Ramones fans, they don’t look like Cramps fans, you know, they’re not all dressed in black. You know, they wear colorful clothing. They just seem like normal college students.

JR: Do you enjoy listening to old Box Tops and Big Star records ?
AC: I don’t listen to my own records to often although I guess I’ve been listening to some of the more recent stuff lately and getting a kick out of that. Big Star has five or six songs I dig listening to and the Box Tops, I guess there are a few things I enjoy. It’s a kick to hear old Box Tops songs on the radio . . .

JR: When was the last time you were in Albany ?
AC: The Sixties

February 11th, 2010

Giuseppi Logan – 2.23.10

“A fantastic return to form for Giuseppi Logan — a contemporary record, but one that grabs us with just as much force as his famous 60s album for ESP!” – Dustygroove.com

“An astonishing comeback record” – All Music Guide (4 stars)

Legendary saxophonist Giuseppi Logan will release his first album in 45 years on NYC’s Tompkins Square label, February 23, 2009.

Logan recorded two albums for the ESP label in the mid-60’s featuring Eddie Gomez, Don Pullen and Milford Graves, The Giuseppi Logan Quartet and More.

The Giuseppi Logan Quintet, recorded in September 2009, reunites Logan with two of his closest collaborators from the ’60’s, pianist Dave Burrell and drummer Warren Smith. Also joining him on the session are Francois Grillot, bass and Matt Lavelle, trumpet and bass clarinet. The album features five brand new Logan compositions, and several standards.

Logan will maintain his rigorous schedule of appearances around the New York City area with his group, as well as his steady solo gig in the NW corner of Tompkins Square Park.

*** A limited number of Autographed copies are now available exclusively via tompkinssquare.com ***

January 7th, 2010

A Broken Consort – Crow Autumn – 2.09.10


Tompkins Square label will release ‘Crow Autumn’ by A Broken Consort on CD, LP and digitally, February 9th, 2010. The vinyl LP is a limited edition of 500.

‘Crow Autumn’ is the latest album by English composer Richard Skelton, who releases haunting and evocative music under a variety of guises through his own much-acclaimed Sustain-Release Private Press. From Clouwbeck to Heidika, Carousell to Riftmusic, his recordings brim with intensity and stark beauty, redolent of the landscapes that inspire them.

Recording here as A Broken Consort – his most prolific and successful pseudonym – Skelton expertly builds on the achievements of last year’s Box Of Birch, creating a dense-yet-delicate weave of textures from a broad palette of acoustic instruments, including guitar, mandolin, piano, violin and accordion. The result is a stunning sequence of swells and eddies, culminating in the orchestral intensity of ‘The River’, with its torrent of interleaved violin melodies and seething undertow.

With Crow Autumn, Skelton has created a work of enduring beauty that should firmly establish him as one of England’s most uniquely talented contemporary artists, capable of rendering with a fine brush the visceral majesty of the natural landscape.

December 6th, 2009

Remembering Jack

On November 20, 15 days ago, I saw Jack Rose’s final performance in NYC. I first saw Jack on March 11, 2004 at Washington Square Church on W. 4th St. He graciously contributed to three compilations on Tompkins Square, and over the years we stayed in touch. Jack stayed on my couch a couple times, played with my older daughter Emma, and sorted through my record collection. He knew all the nuances of all of the different versions of all my John Fahey early pressings. He’d usually send me an email invite when he was coming to NYC to play. I remember early on he picked me up at the Phili train station and we went back to his house, of course we rifled through the records, and later he performed at a Fishtown space where Harris Newman played as well. I hooked Jack up with Peter Walker and they toured. I remember his gig with Michael Chapman at Knitting Factory, and his one with Bridget St. John at Tonic. He played a show I organized at Housing Works in NYC with Glenn Jones, Sean Smith, and Max Ochs. I flew him in for a Tompkins Square show at SXSW one year. Earlier this year he contacted me to possibly put his new record out. I am so grateful to have worked with him some.

Jack was a sweet person. He would always let you know what was on his mind, even if it was not particularly what you wanted to hear. His vast knowledge of pre-war blues and post-war guitar was immense. His playing felt like it channeled through him from somewhere else. At times it seemed effortless. Jack was an experimental player but he was also very formal, disciplined and traditional as well.

At the last show, I got to slip Jack a new gospel comp I put out, and he gave me his new album with the Black Twigs. After the set I gave him a hug and said see you next time. We exchanged emails a few days ago – he said he really dug the gospel set, and I said what a joy it was to see him play, and how much I enjoyed the Twigs. I am really grateful that I had that interaction that now feels like closure, whereas I am sure many many people would have liked to hug him or say goodbye somehow.

I remember one long conversation we had about his trajectory as a player years ago. He said when Fahey died, he and other musicians said “Now what?”. I’m sure plenty of folks will now pose the same question about Jack. He leaves behind a fantastic body of work, and a legacy that is indeed larger than life.

- Josh Rosenthal, NYC

October 2nd, 2009

Fire in My Bones : Raw, Rare & Otherworldly African-American Gospel, 1944-2007


Almost 4 hours of music on 3 discs – super-compelling, undiluted, stripped-down gospel!

Portland & Seattle Record Release events :

Sunday January 17, 8PM – Late
PORTLAND OR
VALENTINE’S: 232 SW Ankeny St Portland, OR 97253 (503) 248-1613
All star all gospel DJ session — Mike McGonigal DJ’s alongside
Portland’s very finest: DJ Hwy 7, DJ Worms, DJ Beyonda Doubt.
Admission: Free

Friday Jan 22, 6 – 8PM
SEATTLE WA
FRYE ART MUSEUM: 704 Terry Avenue Seattle, Washington 98104 (206) 622-9250
Mike McGonigal DJ’ing hip-hop + gospel to accompany the Opening
Reception for “Tim Rollins and K.O.S.: A History”
Admission: for members/ by invite only

Saturday Jan. 23, 1 – 6PM
SEATTLE WA
WALL OF SOUND RECORDS: 315 East Pine Street Seattle, WA 98122-2028
(206) 441-9880 / www.wosound.com
‘Fire In My Bones’ CD Party — Celebrating the release of the 4 hour
compilation with five hours straight of rare + raw gospel DJ’ed by
Mike McG.

The majority of this music has never been reissued on CD, or in any other form (most tracks were originally released on regional independent labels). Most post-WWII compilations of African-American gospel music naturally concentrate on the astounding quartet and solo vocalist sounds made during the music’s Golden Age. Fire In My Bones attempts to address and collect more neglected sounds from that era (and on to the present day). Dozens of traditions are represented. Some go back hundreds of years while others seem to have been arrived at as soon as the tape began to roll. Field recordings and studio tracks are all mashed together, with solo performances next to congregational recordings, hellfire sermons next to afterlife laments. Leon Pinson, Elder & Sister Brinson & the Brinson Brothers, Grant & Ella, Straight Street Holiness Group, Theotis Taylor, Brother & Sister W B Grate — these artists will now be just a little less obscure.

Fire In My Bones provides a small peek at the incredible diversity and power of post-war black gospel. Much of this music is raw, distorted and might sound a bit strange. But it is not presented as a novelty freak show or as “outsider music.” This is gospel – which we must always remember translates as “the good news” – as it has been sung and performed in tiny churches and large programs, from rural Georgia to urban Los Angeles. It is clearly among the most vibrant, playful, beautiful and emotionally charged music in the world.

Produced by Mike McGonigal. Package by Susan Archie. Available everywhere Oct. 27th.